Archive for the 'How To – Do It Yourself' Category

Dec 10 2008

Chunky Apple Butter Recipe

Chunky Apple Butter Recipe

slow cooker – crock pot recipe


© 2008 photo courtesy L Watts

© 2008 photo courtesy L Watts

Chunky Apple Butter

5 + lbs apples, peeled and chopped
use as many different types of apples as you’d like
4 cups sugar
3 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tsp salt

Combine sugar, cinnamon, cloves and salt in crock pot.
Stir well.
Place apples in crock pot, cover and cook on high for 1 hour.
Decrease heat to low
cook on low for 9-11 hours or until thickened and dark brown.
Stirring occasionally.

Uncover and cook on low for 1 hour longer, whisk until smooth.

Spoon into freezer containers leaving 1/2-inch head space and freeze.
or
if canning;
place in pint jars,
use the hot pack method (use hot jars & seals and 10 minute boiling water bath method)

© 2008-2016 oodles of infOrmation

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Dec 01 2008

Kudzu Blossom Jelly Recipe

Kudzu Blossom Jelly Recipe

old fashioned recipe


 

P. Greb, USDA ARS, bugwood.org

P. Greb, USDA ARS, bugwood.org

Kudzu Blossom Jelly Recipe

2 cups firmly packed purple kudzu blossoms, cleaned well
4 1/2 cups water
4 or 5 cups granulated sugar
1 box fruit pectin

Rinse the freshly gathered kudzu blossoms,
making sure the blooms are cleaned well.

In a large saucepan;
bring the blossoms and water to a boil.
Simmer for approximately 20 minutes,
Simmer until the blossom color has faded
The liquid will be a deep lavender color.
Liquid will be strained twice.
first in a colander, discard the blossoms.
Second, pour strained liquid through a jelly bag or cheesecloth.
Use 4 cups of the kudzu liquid with sugar and fruit pectin.
Follow the instructions on pectin package.

makes about 6 cups lavender- pink jelly.
The jelly will smell similar to plum jelly.

~original author of old recipe unknown

Find More information on Kudzu here.

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Oct 30 2008

Storing Flower Bulbs Over Winter

Storing Flower Bulbs Over Winter


Depending on your location in the USDA plant growing zone, most tender bulbs such as Elephant Ears, Cannas, Dahlias, Gladioli, Lilys and others will need to be dug up and stored for the winter. Many who live in cold border zones, also refuse to take a chance with their heirloom Iris.

First be sure and dig the bulbs up very carefully and shake off most of the excess soil. Do NOT rinse them, or let them get near water. If they get wet at this stage, they will rot over Winter. Remember, your bulbs need to be stored in a cool, Not cold, dry location.
When deciding where to store your bulbs, there are 2 things that must be considered; do not let your bulbs freeze and don’t let the storage boxes / containers get wet. If you have a dry, cool secluded corner in the garage or basement, you may have the perfect storage spot.



blue iris in bloom

blue iris in bloom

© 2007 photo courtesy L Watts




Many gardeners wrap their bulbs in newspaper and layer them in boxes. Others save cardboard egg cartons for storing smaller bulbs. Many Master Gardeners suggest dusting the bulbs with a fungicide before storing. Instead of using cardboard others claim the best way to store bulbs is by placing in dry peat moss or wood shavings, place in a brown paper bag. My Aunt used plastic milk crates (available at your local retailer), recycled netted onion bags or even a pair of old tights. No matter which method you use, be sure and label your bulbs before putting them to bed so you will know which bulbs are which in the Spring.

.
One last storage tip;
Make sure you store your bulbs where wild critters can’t get to them. After taking all of the time and effort to dig up each and every bulb, there is no sense in letting your sleeping babies become a Winter feast for the squirrels !

© 2007 oOdles of infOrmation

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